Implications for study

The best source of information about the impact of a disability is often the individual themselves, but the following sections provide some general information about how a disability might impact on study,  and what support students may require, considering the learning environment at Oxford.

They give informal recommendations and guidance about how to support a student. This information does not set out to give medical understanding of a condition, illness or impairment but to highlight the potential impact of a disability on study and present options for study support.

As the impact of a disability varies from individual to individual, the very best source of advice about what is useful is often the student themselves, so talking to them about how their disability affects them is an important step, if they are happy to do so.

In addition to this general information, and the specific information about a student's study needs in the Student Support Plan, the Disability Advisory Service is always available to offer guidance in individual cases.

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ADHD is a neurobiological condition that leads to extreme difficulty with attention, concentration, and impulsivity.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ADHD (PDF)

Autism is a lifelong developmental disorder that affects the way an individual communicates and relates to people around them.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ASD (PDF)

Many disabilities are ‘invisible’ or ‘unseen’ and you would not necessarily guess from first glance that the individual is disabled, and the impact on day-to-day living, although significant, might not be obvious to others.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT CHRONIC MEDICAL CONDITIONS AND UNSEEN DISABILITIES (PDF)

If a student has a hearing impairment (HI), they have some degree of hearing loss but the level of hearing loss and precise nature of impact varies enormously from person to person.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT HEARING IMPAIRMENTS (HI) (PDF)

Mental distress is part of the human experience; it is thought that mental health difficulties will affect up to one in four of us at some stage in our lives. The guide below provides introductory information on supporting those with a long-standing mental health condition in a study context. 

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH DISABILITIES (PDF)

A physical disability or mobility impairment results in varying degrees of limitation in aspects of a person’s physical functioning.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT PHYSICAL DISABILITIES AND MOBILITY IMPAIRMENTS (PDF)

SpLDs (Specific Learning Difficulties – or learning differences) are thought to affect at least 10% of the population. The most common we see amongst students at Oxford are dyslexia and dyspraxia, but a small number of students might have a diagnosis of dysgraphia or dyscalculia.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT SPECIFIC LEARNING DIFFICULTIES (SPLDS) (PDF)

‘Visual impairment’ (VI) is a term used to describe a loss of sight that cannot be corrected using lenses.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS (VI) (PDF)

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